KEEP UP ON SOCIAL MEDIA

TVBC FACEBOOK POSTS

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Join us this morning. ... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

Tannehill Valley Baptist Church

"Connecting with All People" ... See MoreSee Less

Psalm 107:1-9

In verse 1 what are the two reasons to give thanks?

Look at verse 2-7. The people of Israel wandered in the wilderness for 40 years. There struggles were numerous. Write does all the feelings mentioned in. 4-7.

Lostness, fatigue, hunger, thirst, were all in their journey, a journey that wasn’t straight and narrow, but included countless obstacles and unknown paths. How is this often a picture of life even for the believers in Christ?

What does this type wilderness experiences require?

Verses 7-9: God didn’t clear up things in a moment’s notice. Much time was involved. Yet, what promises are found in verses 7-9?

Guzic says this about verse 9: The psalm spoke of those hungry and thirsty in the wilderness, but there is also a longing in the soul of man. God’s literal guidance and deliverance for His redeemed in the wilderness becomes a picture of how He delivers the lost, thirsty, and hungry soul, and fills it with goodness.

It seems that Mary, the mother of Jesus, quoted verse 9 (and fills the hungry soul with goodness) in her song: He has filled the hungry with good things (Luke 1:53). This is one of many scriptural quotations and allusions found in Mary’s song recorded in Luke 1:46-55, showing that she was a woman who knew and loved God’s word.

6. What is the Hoy Spirit impressing upon your heart from this Psalm 107:1-9?

Psalm 107:10-22

Israel’s history is full of troubles. There was a cycle throughout their history given in the Old Testament. Their cycle runs something as this: God favors them—> Israel is glad—> Israel sins—> God chastises —>Israel languishes(enemies hold them) —>God sends a message for them to repent —>Israel repents —>God restores —> Israel is glad... (then repeat).

The sad thing is Israel often suffered as a whole because of the rebellion of some. The Psalmist is writing about he sin of those who caused such anguish. He says, “Others...”(10)

While it is not the case for everyone, why do you think some people have to experience sin’s hardest effects before repenting?

How did God respond when these mentioned in 10-22 repented?

As followers of Jesus and people who have turned to Jesus, He has delivered us from our sin. We have so very much to be grateful for. Spurgeon wrote, “The Lord breaks the strongest gates and bars when the time comes to set free his prisoners: and spiritually the Lord Jesus has broken the most powerful of spiritual bonds and made us free indeed. Brass and iron are [quickly consumed] before the flame of Jesus’ love. The gates of hell shall not prevail against us, neither shall the bars of the grave detain us.”

Is there a particular sin that has been seeking to chain you lately? Let us confess it to the Lord, thank Him for His forgiveness, and seek today to live filled with His Spirit. (1 John 1:9 “If we confess our sins, He is faithful and righteous to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.”)

Psalm 107”;23-32

The Psalmist moves on to “others” who found themselves in desperate situation and needed rescued. As you read verses 25-30 did any New Testament stories come to your mind? If you need a reminder here are a few stories: Matthew 8:23-27; Luke 8:22-25; Matthew 14:22-34.
In Psalm 107, who stilled the storm? In the New Testament stories, who quieted the storm? What do we learn of Jesus? God in the flesh! Was Jesus giving an actual example of Psalm 107:25-30?
Look at the reaction that is to be given in verses 31-32.
It is important to recall that not every ‘storm’ story has a dramatic rescue. That’s true from Scripture and our lives. In Matthew 14, we find where John the Baptist was not rescued physically from his storm(imprisoned and then killed). How do you give thanks when life does not turn out the way you prayed and hoped for? What are other ways Jesus sees us through storms?

1 Timothy 4:1-5

Paul addresses issues that were present in his time and have always taken some form during the church age. The “latter” time began when Christ ascended and will be until He returns. It is a present history not a segment within history. We are living in the last days, and so were those 1000 years ago. Christ may return at anytime the Father chooses.

The emphases in these verses is on false teaching that has been around since the church began in Jerusalem after Christ ascension. False teaching derives from the demonic presence on the earth that is opposed to the gospel of Jesus that we are saved by faith alone. What do you say to people who scoff at the thought of demons and evil?

The false teachers Paul speaks of were trying to add to the gospel message of faith in Christ alone. They added their own rules. Two that were being taught that Paul dealt with were - you are more holy if you don’t marry and you are more holy if you follow the Jewish dietary laws. Do you have your own “list” of things that you judge people’s spiritual value with? Paul called these people hypocrites. That’s the danger with legalism.

These teachings are still around, they just take different forms. Guzic pens these words on this section of Scripture:

“There have always been those in the church who regard themselves as more spiritual than God Himself, and have a stricter set of rules for living than
God does.

In the early centuries of the church, there were monks who went out to desolate desert places to show how spiritual they were by torturing themselves. One never ate cooked food. Another stood all night leaning on a sharp rock so that it was impossible for him to sleep. Another neglected his own body and allowed it to become so dirty that bugs dropped dead from his body. They did this because they thought it would win favor with God and show everyone how spiritual they were.”

5. Paul encouraged the church to enjoy God’s good gifts - to be thankful. Enjoy what God gives a right to enjoy. This week what have you enjoyed that God has given you?

6. How do these verses point us to Jesus and what He has done for us?

Colossians 3:12-17
Verses 12-14 call us to ‘put on’ a number of internal attributes. Look at them, which ones do you need the Holy Spirit to help you the most? What do these internal attributes impact the external actions?
At the end of verse15 we are told to ‘be thankful.’ In verse 16 we are told to sing with ‘gratitude.’ Finally in verse 17, we are told that in all our activities we are to be ‘giving thanks.’ Do you believe you express gratitude for Jesus before others? What can you find to be thankful for in the Covid issue?
... See MoreSee Less

Psalm 107:1-9

In verse 1 what are the two reasons to give thanks?

Look at verse 2-7. The people of Israel wandered in the wilderness for 40 years. There struggles were numerous. Write does all the feelings mentioned in. 4-7.

Lostness, fatigue, hunger, thirst, were all in their journey, a journey that wasn’t straight and narrow, but included countless obstacles and unknown paths. How is this often a picture of life even for the believers in Christ? 

What does this type wilderness experiences require?

Verses 7-9: God didn’t clear up things in a moment’s notice. Much time was involved. Yet, what promises are found in verses 7-9?

Guzic says this about verse 9: The psalm spoke of those hungry and thirsty in the wilderness, but there is also a longing in the soul of man. God’s literal guidance and deliverance for His redeemed in the wilderness becomes a picture of how He delivers the lost, thirsty, and hungry soul, and fills it with goodness.

It seems that Mary, the mother of Jesus, quoted verse 9 (and fills the hungry soul with goodness) in her song: He has filled the hungry with good things (Luke 1:53). This is one of many scriptural quotations and allusions found in Mary’s song recorded in Luke 1:46-55, showing that she was a woman who knew and loved God’s word.

6. What is the Hoy Spirit impressing upon your heart from this Psalm 107:1-9?

Psalm 107:10-22

Israel’s history is full of troubles. There was a cycle throughout their history given in the Old Testament. Their cycle runs something as this: God favors them—> Israel is glad—> Israel sins—> God chastises —>Israel languishes(enemies hold them) —>God sends a message for them to repent —>Israel repents —>God restores —> Israel is glad... (then repeat).

The sad thing is Israel often suffered as a whole because of the rebellion of some. The Psalmist is writing about he sin of those who caused such anguish. He says, “Others...”(10)

While it is not the case for everyone, why do you think some people have to experience sin’s hardest effects before repenting? 

How did God respond when these mentioned in 10-22 repented?

As followers of Jesus and people who have turned to Jesus, He has delivered us from our sin. We have so very much to be grateful for. Spurgeon wrote, “The Lord breaks the strongest gates and bars when the time comes to set free his prisoners: and spiritually the Lord Jesus has broken the most powerful of spiritual bonds and made us free indeed. Brass and iron are [quickly consumed] before the flame of Jesus’ love. The gates of hell shall not prevail against us, neither shall the bars of the grave detain us.”

Is there a particular sin that has been seeking to chain you lately? Let us confess it to the Lord, thank Him for His forgiveness, and seek today to live filled with His Spirit. (1 John 1:9 “If we confess our sins, He is faithful and righteous to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.”)

Psalm 107”;23-32

The Psalmist moves on to “others” who found themselves in desperate situation and needed rescued. As you read verses 25-30 did any New Testament stories come to your mind? If you need a reminder here are a few stories: Matthew 8:23-27; Luke 8:22-25; Matthew 14:22-34. 
In Psalm 107, who stilled the storm? In the New Testament stories, who quieted the storm? What do we learn of Jesus? God in the flesh! Was Jesus giving an actual example of Psalm 107:25-30?
Look at the reaction that is to be given in verses 31-32. 
It is important to recall that not every ‘storm’ story has a dramatic rescue. That’s true from Scripture and our lives. In Matthew 14, we find where John the Baptist was not rescued physically from his storm(imprisoned and then killed). How do you give thanks when life does not turn out the way you prayed and hoped for? What are other ways Jesus sees us through storms?

1 Timothy 4:1-5

Paul addresses issues that were present in his time and have always taken some form during the church age. The “latter” time began when Christ ascended and will be until He returns. It is a present history not a segment within history. We are living in the last days, and so were those 1000 years ago. Christ may return at anytime the Father chooses.

The emphases in these verses is on false teaching that has been around since the church began in Jerusalem after Christ ascension. False teaching derives from the demonic presence on the earth that is opposed to the gospel of Jesus that we are saved by faith alone. What do you say to people who scoff at the thought of demons and evil?

The false teachers Paul speaks of were trying to add to the gospel message of faith in Christ alone. They added their own rules. Two that were being taught that Paul dealt with were - you are more holy if you don’t marry and you are more holy if you follow the Jewish dietary laws. Do you have your own “list” of things that you judge people’s spiritual value with? Paul called these people hypocrites. That’s the danger with legalism.

These teachings are still around, they just take different forms. Guzic pens these words on this section of Scripture:

 “There have always been those in the church who regard themselves as more spiritual  than God Himself, and have a stricter set of rules for living than
 God does.
 
 In the early centuries of the church, there were monks who went out to desolate desert  places to show how spiritual they were by torturing themselves. One never ate cooked  food. Another stood all night leaning on a sharp rock so that it was impossible for him to  sleep. Another neglected his own body and allowed it to become so dirty that bugs  dropped dead  from his body. They did this because they thought it would  win favor with  God and show everyone how spiritual they were.”

5. Paul encouraged the church to enjoy God’s good gifts - to be thankful. Enjoy what God gives  a right to enjoy. This week what have you enjoyed that God has given you?

6. How do these verses point us to Jesus and what He has done for us?

Colossians 3:12-17
Verses 12-14 call us to ‘put on’ a number of internal attributes. Look at them, which ones do you need the Holy Spirit to help you the most? What do these internal attributes impact the external actions?
At the end of verse15 we are told to ‘be thankful.’ In verse 16 we are told to sing with ‘gratitude.’ Finally in verse 17, we are told that in all our activities we are to be ‘giving thanks.’ Do you believe you express gratitude for Jesus before others? What can you find to be thankful for in the Covid issue?

Song of the week

He Will Hold Me Fast – Matt Merker

Listen here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=BP0dtwXWQ_M

“Now to him who is able to keep you from stumbling and to present you blameless before the presence of his glory with great joy…”

The Bible teaches us that we are to persevere, and to keep ourselves in the love of Christ. However, even as we hold on to God, it is God, who by His sovereign grace, is holding even more tightly onto us.
“All that the Father gives me will come to me, and whoever comes to me I will never cast out.” – John 6:37

Thank you,

Joe Marchetti
Music Minister – Tannehill Valley Baptist Church
(601)-540-6430
Proverbs 3:5-6
SOLI DEO GLORIA
... See MoreSee Less

Video image

Comment on Facebook

A correction for today’s TVBC reading plan from Psalm 107. The verses should be 10-22, instead of 10-21. ... See MoreSee Less

Load more